Home » Life after cancer » Life in Remission – Physical Aftershocks

Life in Remission – Physical Aftershocks

Clearly, going back to work full time has seriously infringed on my blog writing, and that stinks if you ask me. If I’m not at work, I’m driving to/from work, catching up on work at home, cooking, cleaning, running errands, playing with our kittens (fun! fun! I have absolutely become a crazy cat woman) or sleeping. In fact, most of my free non-work (or doing-things-to-make-Jeff-and-Jocelyne-be-functioning-members-of-society) time has been spent sleeping or resting. I even had trouble staying up to watch the Red Sox in the World Series, and that should tell you something, especially if you know me in “real life”.

So, I have amassed a list of topics that I have been wanting to touch on for the last month or so. Forgive the haphazard nature of things, but I’m going to try to write about what’s been going on lately over a couple of posts. My physical health is still at the forefront of my thoughts on most days so it’s what I’ll address first.

I had my first 3 month post-remission checkup a few weeks ago with my hematology oncologist, and everything turned out great, as did my appointment with my radiation oncologist about a week ago or so. During the checkup with my hem/onc, I had blood work to check on complete blood cell counts and tumor markers, like lactose dehydrogenase (LDH), that were elevated while I was sick. My hem/onc feels confident in looking at these values and assessing whether I’m still in remission every other checkup, as opposed to doing CT scans every time, and I’m confident in his confidence. I will have a CT scan every six months, so I’m scheduled for my first post-remission CT scan in January. It is called a re-staging scan, but I’m sure I’m not alone in feeling like this is not optimistic terminology. Why can’t they call it a “remission confirmation” scan? In reality, scans only catch about 2% of recurrences of diffuse large B cell NHL, according to current research. This is largely because the masses characteristically grow so quickly that it is usually patient symptoms that tip off clinicians as to a recurrence or relapse as opposed to scans or even blood work so it really comes down to me checking in on my overall health and how I feel everyday that is the most important.

Even though I’d been feeling okay coming up to the most recent appointments, I’d be lying if I said that I wasn’t worried right before both of them for some reason. My original symptoms were extreme fatigue, pain behind the shoulder blades, profuse and unexplained sweating, heart palpitations, and trouble breathing, not just shortness of breath. They were all well beyond the norm and completely abnormal. However, right before this follow up with my hem/onc, I was seriously concerned every morning that I woke up overly tired (welcome to the life of a cancer patient – you almost always wake up tired or get tired at some point in the day, even in remission) or I sweated a lot/was short of breath after climbing up a flight of stairs. Never mind that my aerobic capacity is next to nothing because I’ve been laid up for a year, and let’s be honest, I’ve never been the picture of physical fitness to begin with. (The President’s Physical Fitness Test that we had to take in elementary school gym every year still gives me nightmares – sit-ups were the bane of my existence.) Yet, with every labored breath and every drop of sweat, I couldn’t help but think (and still do think, even after the appointment) that It had come back. I have to constantly remind myself that these day to day reactions aren’t severe – they’re normal.

My hematology oncologist put my mind at ease, as he always does. It wasn’t surprising to him that I was anxious and still not feeling great. In fact, he said that he would have been surprised if he walked into the exam room and I told him that I was feeling fine. He reminded me that I’ve been through a lot over the past ten months and it’s going to take a lot of time to get back to “normal”. Since my blood work looked good, he is confident that I am still in remission and things are fine for now.

In truth, I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to let go of the “for now” part of that statement. I just feel like I’m waiting for the other shoe to drop whether it’s in the near future or years down the line. Somehow I can’t shake the feeling that my “battle” (I hate that term but can’t think of anything better) isn’t over yet. I’m hoping that feeling will go away once I’m out of the two year window when recurrence/relapse is most likely, but a lot of patients/survivors have told me that feeling never really goes away, so we shall see.

Being back at school and teaching full time is generally a good feeling. It is very tiring, though. There are still days when I feel like I got hit by a truck, and I’m experiencing a lot of bone and joint pain that my hem/onc delicately attributed to “de-conditioning” and side effects from chemo and radiation. There are some days where the pain in my hands, especially, is excruciating. I never thought myself to be one for a massage – frankly, the thought of a stranger touching me in any way creeps me out – but there has been more than one day lately that I’ve thought having a massage would be positively heavenly. The pain and fatigue is slowly ameliorating, though and I’m sure I’ll get better as time goes on. My hem/onc had a patient with diffuse large B cell who was a professional cyclist prior to diagnosis and it took him two years to get back to normal, so I think I’m doing well, relatively speaking.

In terms of other long term side effects…my periods seem to have finally gone back to normal. That’s too much info for some, I’m sure, but fertility problems are a reality for many female cancer patients. I still have digestive tract issues, including some that “flare up” and make everything very uncomfortable. I’ll leave what exactly is going on to your interpretation. Those sorts of issues will probably stick with me for the rest of my life, but at least I have a life to live, and Preparation H and I are forever entwined, I suppose. While I will say that having cancer has taught me many things, many of which were good, it has also taught me that when it comes to the physical effects, cancer is a disappointing gift that just keeps on giving.

I am positive that the physical side effects will wane, or at least become a part of my new normal, which I can handle. If being in remission means being a little bit more tired/winded and being occasionally reminded of nagging, but harmless, long term side effects, I’ll gladly take it over the alternative – that’s for sure.

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