Being a Young Adult (YA) with Cancer

In the cancer world, I am considered a young adult patient (YA; someone diagnosed with cancer between the ages of 18-39).  In contrast, pediatric patients are those under 18 and patients who are 40+, I suppose, are just ‘cancer patients’ – no special labels for them. Over the past few months, I’ve experienced many things that YAs with cancer have to deal with that might not be so common among pediatric and/or older patients and since I’m writing on this blog about what it’s like to be a 30 year old with cancer, I should probably touch on some of these issues. I’ve been able to reflect on them a lot more now that I’m done with active treatment, so here we go.

A jumping off point…recently, a column was posted in the Huffington Post.com’s Healthy Living section by a 20 year old woman named Elise Frame who was diagnosed with leukemia, and she equates being a YA with cancer as being in a sort of medical no-man’s land. We are treated in the adult center because of our age, although we face many of the same issues as pediatric patients (concerns about living a healthy life after cancer/avoiding recurrence) and older patients alike (job security, health insurance coverage, maintaining relationships).

I must admit that it sounds like I’ve had a much better experience in the adult cancer center at my hospital than Ms. Frame had at hers. We have psychologists and nutritionists who specialize in working with cancer patients that are available to us at any time. I’ve partaken in art and pet therapy while getting treatments (Coloring with crayons and petting furry dogs really does make you feel better when you’re getting chemo, by the way. You basically revert to a child-like state.). There are numerous social workers and patient advocates available to help you navigate the insurance maze, handle medical leaves, and applying for state aid. Most importantly, my doctors, nurses and therapists are amazingly caring and compassionate people. They seem to love their jobs and have gone out of their way to make me feel as comfortable as possible.

That said, being a YA with cancer has presented its own share of issues that may not be encountered by younger or older patients.

First of all, there’s the simple fact that as a YA with cancer, you don’t often see other patients in your age group at the adult cancer center. I was in active treatment for seven months, and over that time, I saw patients in the center who were relatively close to my age less than 5 times. Otherwise, I was typically surrounded by middle aged or, mostly, elderly patients. Not seeing anyone else “like you” can make you feel really isolated and circus side show-y as you walk around the clinic.

The one thing I craved during treatment more than anything else (other than sleep and to be cured) was to connect with people my age who were going through the same thing. The easiest place for a patient to connect to other patients is in their cancer center while they’re getting treatment. Even a brief conversation with a fellow patient to commiserate can be a huge pick me up in your day. While I didn’t mind chatting with Ethel about how horrible she feels and how her grandchildren are coming by to visit her in the clinic later on, it wasn’t the same as talking with someone my own age who was also getting treatment. When chatting with the elderly patients, I felt like I needed to put on a sweet smile and be overly polite when I really just wanted to talk to someone like I would one of my friends about how horribly sick I felt. As much as talking to my own friends and family helped in some ways, no one really knows what you’re going through as a cancer patient unless they’ve been through it themselves, making connecting with other YA cancer patients all the more important.

My cancer center has support groups that meet once a week or every other week, but it would be really nice if they had a YA specific group. I know of several centers that do this, but if this isn’t available to you, you have to seek out other avenues of support. Fortunately, a non-profit for YAs called Stupid Cancer (www.stupidcancer.org) was formed by a YA patient in 2007. Their website has forums where you can connect with other patients on a variety of topics. They also have a Facebook page and a podcast so you can connect that way as well. StupidCancer also holds a yearly summit to allow patients/survivors to meet and interact and the regional divisions hold smaller meet ups across the country. They also advertise seminars and conferences specifically for YAs with cancer, so it’s a great resource.

Many non-profits/societies for specific types of cancer have support groups and fortunately for me, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society holds an online chat each week specifically for YAs who currently are undergoing treatment for blood cancers and survivors. I’ve been joining in on that group for a few weeks now, and it’s been helpful to discuss side effects, how everyone deals with different obstacles, and just to feel connected to other patients. This blog has helped me to connect to other patients, too, both through comment sections on other blogs or via email. It certainly helps to connect to other patients in any way that you can.

Medically speaking, there are a number of issues YAs face that might be shared with pediatric patients but not older adult patients in adult clinics. Because the majority of patients in adult clinics are not YAs, the oncologists in those clinics may not be as comfortable with discussing some of these issues as they’re often focused on the effects of cancer and treatments on older patients. This is ultimately why Ms. Frame chose to switch to a pediatric clinic as YAs and pediatric patients alike deal with the reality that having cancer and being blasted with chemo and radiation at a young age can have significant side effects on your health for the rest of your, hopefully, lengthy life. Older patients may have secondary illnesses further down the line, but the fact remains that they likely don’t have to live a majority of their lives with the issues I’ll mention below.

When my oncology team got to the point where they were discussing the side effects of chemotherapy with me in the hospital, my thoughts quickly went to what effects chemotherapy would have on my fertility. As a married woman in my early 30s with no children (although Jeff and I do want to have them), you can’t help but immediately worry that chemotherapy could prevent you from having biological children of your own. (Chemo wreaks havoc on the female reproductive system – it can cause temporary or permanent infertility and early menopause, and radiation can permanently damage the ovaries and/or eggs, if you are radiated in the abdominal region.) In a matter of just a few days, I went from leading a normal life and planning on having kids down the line to being suddenly faced with the prospect that I might not ever be able to have children of my own with Jeff.

A quick, but important, side note here. I really like my hematology oncologist for a variety of reasons – most importantly that he is an excellent physician – but I think one of the reasons I feel so comfortable with him is that he is in his late 30s, only a few years older than me. I have been able to talk with him about all of the potential issues I’m facing specifically as a YA cancer patient, because I know they’re issues he can identify with, even if most of his other patients are much older than me. This is a large part of the reason why I feel so well cared for in the adult clinic.

When I brought up my concerns regarding fertility, my hematology oncologist immediately validated my feelings and concerns. He informed me that about 90% of women my age who undergo R-CHOP keep their fertility and have children after treatment. It might be harder than it would have been, but it is possible. He did say though that there was a possibility that I could lose my fertility due to treatment, so he brought in a reproductive endocrinologist for me to speak with about our options in terms of preserving my fertility and I met with her before I began my treatments. The urgency with which he handled this and the validation he gave my concerns was really important to me. I’ve heard many stories from other YAs who say that their oncologists didn’t feel that the preservation of fertility was as important as starting treatment right away, and I’ve heard of patients who really had to lobby to get more detailed information about their options before beginning treatment. My oncologist recognized that I have a life outside of cancer that could be changed dramatically and permanently if he didn’t do what he could to help me make the best decision, and I am so grateful for that.

(Just for those who are curious…the repro. endocrinologist informed me that our best option for preserving fertility was to freeze our embryos as if we were undergoing the in vitro fertilization process. Apparently, storing embryos, as opposed to solely eggs, is more effective in the long term. There are some downsides to this process, though. The most important of which at that point was that I would have to hold off on starting chemo treatments for about three weeks and would have to inject myself with hormones everyday to stimulate egg production. I would feel even worse than I already did and I would risk the mass spreading or growing in the meantime. Although I’m insured through an employer in Massachusetts where infertility treatments are completely covered by insurance, I was a patient in Rhode Island where it is not covered. Thus, the process would cost a minimum of $7,000. But, I was informed that “storage” of the embryos was “fairly cheap” at $300/year. They would have been stored at a facility in Manhattan. It’s an odd thought – I would be carrying out my life in Rhode Island and our embryos would just be chillin’ (literally) at a facility in NYC. Ultimately, Jeff and I felt strongly that our chance to have children on our own was still good and I really didn’t want to have to wait to begin treatment so we decided against this whole process. Plus, we didn’t want to go into debt on top of everything else that was going on to save some embryos that we might not need.)

I’m hoping to get at least another 50 years out of this body, so I have to think about other effects that chemotherapy and radiation may have on me years down the line. For one thing, I will have to live a good portion of my life getting lab work and scans and checking in with both of my oncologists. That doesn’t sound taxing but the wait in between, constantly worrying if something new will show up or if your old cancer will come back, can be excruciating. Because I will have a longer period of time ahead of me than most other adult patients, I have a greater (although still relatively low) likelihood of developing a secondary cancer from radiation, like breast or lung cancer. I will also have a greater likelihood of developing heart disease earlier in life and may need to have arteries or valves replaced in my heart due to the side effects of R-CHOP. Many of these issues are those that are known to develop 20-30 years down the line, well after many older cancer patients would expect to live. Again, it helps in my case that I have an oncologist who talked through these possibilities with me before I began both my chemo and radiation treatments. Not every YA patient has this opportunity to know what they’re getting into.

While I’m sure that the cosmetic issues faced by cancer patients is tough regardless of age, I think they are tougher on pediatric and, particularly, YA patients. Imagine being a 21 year old young woman without hair, eyebrows, eyelashes, or nails. Imagine that your skin is yellowed and dry and you’ve either lost or gained a tremendous amount of weight from your treatments. It can be demoralizing and debilitating. It’s a time in your life where you try to look your best to attract a significant other and you feel as if you’re supposed to be in your physical prime and yet, you don’t even recognize yourself in the mirror anymore. Having an oncologist who sympathizes with this and can help you plan for hair loss or answer your seemingly superficial questions (like, “When can I dye my hair again?”) is a very good thing, but I fear that not all oncologists in adult clinics are receptive to these types of conversations as they view treatment as the only thing that is important.

There are effects on YAs beyond the medical issues that may not be as prominent for cancer patients of other age groups. As we’ve learned through all of the discussions about “Obamacare”, YAs are more likely not to have adequate insurance as this is a time in life when you may think you don’t need to worry about having a job with good benefits or that it’s more important to get a job/internship doing something you love, even if it doesn’t offer health insurance. On top of that, YAs tend to think that nothing “bad” will happen to them in terms of their health so purchasing private insurance isn’t a perceived necessary expense. Let me tell you, my cancer care, which isn’t all that complex compared to what other patients go through, has been billed to my insurance to tune of easily $500,000 and climbing every day. A colleague of mine had a complex case of leukemia and her care cost over $2 million. Imagine having to cover this out of pocket as a 22 year old intern at a magazine. The fact is, you couldn’t cover. Cancer can financially ruin YA patients if they aren’t prepared with good insurance coverage. Even if they have insurance, it might not cover everything and the co-pays and deductibles alone can be overwhelming. While pediatric patients are often covered by their parent’s insurance or can be covered by state/federal aid programs and older adults are likely to be more established in their careers and have benefits coverage or may be eligible for Medicaid/Medicare, many YAs may not be prepared for this type of disease to hit them and are caught financially off guard.

Further, YAs may be in college or working their first full time job when they’re diagnosed. Managing college classes and living amongst several thousand other people in a dorm aren’t exactly the best conditions for a cancer patient so many YAs are forced to take a leave of absence from school for an undetermined amount of time. They’re then disconnected from their social networks and can feel even more isolated. YAs who are lucky enough to have a full time job are usually at the start of the careers and their position at a particular company might be more tenuous than that of an older adult patient. Job security is a clear issue for YAs with cancer and it can be difficult to find your way back into the workforce again after you go into remission.

Finally, there are many social issues that YAs with cancer must deal with. As I’ve mentioned before, telling my parents and my husband that I had cancer was the hardest thing that I’ve had to do. No adult child should have to have that conversation with their parents – it’s absolutely gut wrenching. I am lucky in that my husband and I have been together for 14 years or so, so bumps in the road like this are manageable for us. However, I could imagine where a YA with cancer who has a “younger” relationship might struggle and it would be even more difficult to find a significant other during or after treatment as your self esteem can really bottom out between the hair loss, surgery scars, and weight gain/loss that can come with treatment.

This isn’t to say that pediatric or older adult patients don’t go through some or all of these issues, but I think the YA population is really dealt a tough and complex hand when they receive a cancer diagnosis. I have been SO lucky to keep a constant salary and benefits, to know that my job will be there for me when I’m ready to come back, to keep steady relationships with family and friends, and to have medical teams that understand what I’m going through. Unfortunately, not every YA is so lucky. In the future, I’d love to see more support for this group and I’ll continue to do what I can to get the word out!

An Update…

There really has not been much to report since my last radiation treatment until I had a great visit with my hematology oncologist yesterday. I’ve decided that he is essentially the best oncologist I could have ended up with for this whole process for a variety of reasons, and being assigned to him as a patient was really a function of random luck – he was the on call oncologist over the weekend when my biopsy results started coming back when I was in the hospital back in November. When I briefly expressed my thanks yesterday for all he’s done so far, he was quick to remind me that we’re not out of the woods yet and I can thank him when I get a clean scan – spoken like a true doctor, hedging his bets.

We covered a lot of ground yesterday. My blood work (complete blood cell count, white and red blood cell counts, neutrophils and B cell counts, and LDH and uric acid levels) looked great overall. According to my blood, I’m back to “normal”, or at least where I was when I started this whole shindig. I’m hoping my blood spreads the message to the rest of my body soon because I’m still feeling fatigued and have some shoulder and swallowing pain from the radiation. For all intents and purposes, though, I’m not immuno-compromised anymore so feel free to sneeze on me the next time you see me. It won’t kill me anymore, although I might get a cold, which would stink.

I then asked him a question I had never really thought to ask before – why did my mass not spread elsewhere? I’ve been reading an excellent book by Siddhartha Mukherjee called the The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer. It was a Pulitzer Prize winner in 2010. If you have any interest in cancer whatsoever, it is a fascinating read. Dr. Mukherjee writes about all of the discoveries made since the 1500’s or so about cancer – what it is as a disease, how to treat it using surgery, chemotherapy, hormone therapy and/or radiation therapy, the role of viruses in cancer, and how different forms are vastly different from one another among many other things. It’s brought up so many questions for me but this was the one that really stuck out, especially since I’ve connected with other diffuse large B cell patients who had much smaller masses than me but they spread to other sites quickly.

As a reminder, I was diagnosed with diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with a primary site in the mediastinum (area between the rib cage and the lungs). My mediastinal mass was 13cm or so in length and it started in the lymphatic system, which is essentially a network of spherical nodes connected by ducts that runs throughout the entire body. The nodes are all interconnected, so it is unbelievable that none of the cancer cells hanging out in my chest migrated via the duct system and starting going into overdrive in other parts of my body. There are several places not far from the mediastinum where the nodes are more concentrated so I began to wonder if my armpits were somehow inhospitable for cancer? Is the area above and below my clavicle unwelcoming? Does lymphoma not like my neck? What’s the deal here?

Don’t get me wrong – I’m not complaining. One gigantic mass was more than enough for me, thank you very much, but as a biologist, I can’t help but think about these things. Who better to ask than my doctor about that, right? (The poor guy gets put through the ringer whenever I have an appointment, that’s for sure. He said he would be concerned if I didn’t have my little notebook out filled with questions for each appointment.)

I asked him this question – why did the cancer cells stay put? His short answer was, “Jocelyne, if I knew the answer to that question, I’d be a millionaire” but he explained that it likely had spread to micro-sites – in other words, cancerous cells likely inhabited other areas of my body but they were perhaps in small enough aggregates that they couldn’t be picked up on a CT scan. Fortunately, we caught it all early enough that those micro-sites hadn’t grown enough yet to be detectable.

This led into a bigger discussion of my diagnosis and treatment plan. He explained that the stages of diffuse large B cell NHL generally aren’t as crucial in terms of successful treatment and cure than it is for other forms and that varying amounts of R-CHOP rounds are very effective for all stages. This is in comparison to a disease like breast cancer where stage 2 is curable while stage 4 is often terminal. For reference, in the case of lymphoma, stage 1 patients have a single localized mass either above or below the diaphragm (the muscle that divides the chest cavity and the abdominal cavity). Stage 2 patients have more than 1 mass but they’re gathered above or below the diaphragm. Stage 3 patients present localized masses above and below the diaphragm but they’re not widespread, and stage 4 patients have widespread masses above and below the diaphragm. There are also a and b levels of each stage that denote severity/size.

I was technically a stage 1B patient – my mass was large but localized to one area. However, he explained that there is a push to classify diffuse large B cell NHL with a primary site in the mediastinum as its own form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma because it behaves differently than diffuse large B cell that presents in other areas of the body. He said that a notable majority of the patients who develop mediastinal large B cell are women in their 20s-30s. It requires more rounds of chemotherapy to knock down relative to patients who have similar sized diffuse large B cell masses in other areas of the body and a greater percentage of mediastinal patients require radiation after chemotherapy. In fact, mediastinal large B cell is being referred to more as its own form in Europe but the American cancer community isn’t quite there yet. If it was considered its own form, he would suspect that I would be perhaps at a stage 3 or so.

After this whole explanation, he just looked at me and said, “I didn’t really answer your question, though. The truth is, we don’t know why a mass of your type stays localized but grows to such a formidable size.” I’m totally okay with that answer. In fact, I expected it but curiosity urged me to go ahead and ask anyway.

After my last radiation treatment, I met with one of the center’s registered dieticians and we discussed a number of topics, including the importance of eating organic produce and all natural meats. This is a topic that probably deserves its own post and maybe I’ll get there somewhere down the line. Ultimately, the dietician felt that eating a produce based diet (not completely vegetarian but skewing more towards vegetables and fruits with lean protein) is the important thing to focus on in a “cancer survivor’s diet” (her words, not mine…I mean, isn’t this the diet we should all be following anyway?). However, if you can afford to purchase some or all organic, it certainly can’t hurt. The jury is still out on how much it will help to prevent future bouts with cancer. If you have to make choices for budgetary reasons (because let’s face it, paying $5/lb for organic apples is bonkers), splurging on organic thin  skinned fruits and veggies is the way to go as they tend to soak up more pesticides.

I asked my oncologist about this and he generally agreed, although he thought the splurge would be better served to go towards all natural/hormone free chicken. In the same breath, he said there’s no real data to show that eating all natural and organic would make a significant different in recurrence rates and he didn’t count out the possibility that we’ll find out 10 years from now that eating “organic” was just a load of bunk, as he put it. For now, I’m going to wash all of my produce thoroughly and buy the most natural chicken that I can and hope for the best.

My oncologist also reminded me that we don’t know what caused my case of cancer. Likely, it was a combination of environmental factors plus a roll of the genetic dice and some random chance thrown in for good measure. You can drive yourself crazy avoiding ALL of the things that could, maybe, possibly, cause cancer. Considering that keeping stress levels low is important as well, he recommended that I just do my best to avoid obvious sources (smoking, smokers, tanning beds, sun exposure without sunblock, tons of red meat, excessive alcohol…you know, the fun stuff) and try to eat as healthfully as possible.

From there, we moved onto scheduling my restaging PET/CT scan…this one’s the biggie as it will tell us whether I have any remaining active cancer cells. I finished up radiation on June 13th, and my radiation oncologist had suggested that we wait 2-3 months (!!!) before a restaging scan. Radiation causes inflammation of the tissues in the area receiving radiation and those areas can cause a false positive on the scan if you don’t leave enough time for them to go down. Thankfully, my hematology oncologist felt that was a bit too long of a wait and his previous experience suggests that four weeks is enough time to avoid a false positive. He said, “Why wait that long if we can figure out what’s going on in there much sooner?” I like the way he thinks! So he scheduled the scan for July 15th and I’ll meet with him on July 18th to get the results.

Those three days will be pure agony, but it will be worth the wait if the scan comes back clean. I don’t know exactly what emotions will fill me that day if it does come back clean. I was so excited to finish up radiation as you can see from the pure bliss experienced while eating my celebratory ice cream cone:

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Jeff and I have been together for almost 14 years now, and he said that moment was the happiest he has ever seen me in our entire relationship. This included college and grad school graduations and our wedding day, and quite frankly, he is right, although our wedding day is a very close second, so I don’t even know what I will feel if my oncologist tells me that I’m cancer free on July 18th.

I do know that I will celebrate, and with much more than an ice cream cone!!

Last Dance (with Radiation)

Yes, friends, tomorrow is my last dance with radiation. Treatment number 22 of 22. It’s been a long month with all these treatments, and by noon tomorrow, they will be all done for now. Advance the video below to about 1:24 and this is what will be playing in my head as I boogie out of the radiation oncology department tomorrow afternoon.

And I kid you not – I will for sure do a little dance on my way out. I have really not enjoyed radiation, not that anyone really enjoys it but I found it to be a more difficult process in a lot of ways than chemotherapy.  My radiation oncologist commented to me today that I made it through treatment surprisingly well – no skin burning (hooray!) and no advancement of my trouble breathing and swallowing and pain around my shoulders since last week (whoopie!). In the next breath, he told me that since I’m “so young”, I will need to have regular appointments with him for the next 10 years (yahoo!!!!). It looks like my oncologists and I will have a hard time getting rid of each other over the next decade.

Many people have asked me what I’m doing tomorrow to celebrate the completion of active, scheduled treatment. I really didn’t have anything planned, because in my mind, there isn’t much to celebrate until I get a clean PET scan in the middle of August (hopefully this is when it will be scheduled, maybe even a bit earlier). I’m not going to tempt fate in the least, even though both of my oncologists are certain radiation will get rid of the remaining active cells. I feel pretty much exactly as I did before treatment, so I’m not certain of anything until they can show me a PET scan without any “hot” spots.

In the meantime, celebration will mean not having to go to the cancer center every single weekday for the foreseeable future. Celebration will also mean getting to stay home and truly recover (my nurse has told me to treat myself as if I’m still in treatment for another month as this is how long it will take) until I go back to work in the fall.

But don’t take me for a complete party pooper. One of my radiation therapists suggested that I at least get an ice cream cone tomorrow afternoon to have a tiny celebration. I am very easily convinced to partake in ice cream. I will not protest it in the least. Jeff’s going to take me after he’s done with work tomorrow, because I should not have to pay for my own celebratory ice cream cone, damn it. Feel free to join me from wherever you are tomorrow afternoon with a little treat of your own. To no more radiation!!

 

Catching up…it’s been a busy week!

I have a few topics that I’m planning to write about in a bit more in depth but in the meantime, I’d like to catch everyone up on what has been going on with my treatments and with me. Beware, for this post is a hodge podge of sorts…

I’m now on radiation treatment 15 of 22. My scheduled treatments will be completely done on June 13th! I got a nice surprise today when I overheard my radiation therapist giving my daily appointment at 11:15am to another patient beginning on the 14th. While I felt horribly for this new patient as she looked quite overwhelmed by the process (I’ve been there, that’s for sure), it was amazing to hear that my radiation time won’t be mine anymore!

I’ve been seeing my radiation oncologist each week and I’m sure I will see him at least 1-2 more times after I complete my treatment, just to follow up on side effects. Speaking of, I’m not feeling too much in terms of side effects other than fatigue and some difficulty swallowing along with occasional shortness of breath. These side effects are all normal for radiation in the chest area so everything is going along as expected so far. My skin is holding up fairly well and I’ve been really diligent about using Eucerin (as suggested by my radiation oncology nurse) after each treatment. I’m sure this has helped, although it’s likely just a matter of time before it begins to burn. Radiation is really more of a mental grind than a physical one, but I’m having an easier time with it now that I’m more than halfway done with the process.

In other news, I was given the go ahead to dye my hair by the hematology oncologist. This sounds awfully vain but my hair (what little I have) was coming in white and grayish-brown. Given that we just went through what a meteorologist calls a heat wave (and I call a period when I go outside and feel like I’m swimming in soup), I knew I wasn’t long for wearing a hat, else I die of heat stroke (wouldn’t that be a kicker?). At the same time, I wasn’t ready to go without a hat in public with my hair looking like it did so when I got the go ahead to dye it, I immediately went to the store to pick up a box of semi-permanent color.

I did do some online research to see what other women experienced when they dyed their hair for the first time post-chemotherapy. Chemo affects all fast growing cells and even if your hair is growing back, as mine is, it could still contain some of the medication in the hair follicle and this can react with hair dye. Some women posted on various message boards that their hair ended up a horrid shade of orange when they dyed it at home for the first time. This scared me a little bit because I have been known to turn my hair orange with home hair dye (accidentally) before chemotherapy (shivers go down my spine as I’m reminded of the home highlight job of 2003 that made me look like I was wearing a brown and orange zebra pelt on my head). Other women reported that some of their hair fell out again after they dyed their hair. I’ve been growing this hair for the past three months. I don’t have a ton and I would have been devastated if it all fell out after I dyed it.

I asked my oncologist if I should use or avoid any particular products and he said any kind should be fine. I opted for Clairol Natural Instincts in a medium brown as this is close to my natural color and it’s a semi-permanent dye. It washes out in 28 shampoos and is ammonia free. With a good deal of trepidation, I locked myself in the bathroom to do the deed and to my surprise, it came out perfectly and none of my hair fell out. I am finding that it’s fading a little faster than normal but otherwise, it looks good if I do say so myself.

I’m sure many of you are wondering why I didn’t go to a salon to get it professionally colored. To that I say that I have about 2″ of hair – I’m not going to pay upwards of $50-60 to get that little amount of hair dyed by a professional. I made the pact with myself that if I was going to do this on my own, I had to be prepared for the possibility that it could end up a disaster and I might have to shave my head to start from scratch. I was willing to take the risk and it turned out really nicely.

Since my color looked good, I decided to go without any kind of head covering last Friday for the first time since December and it felt pretty good. It’s still a little short for comfort but I love how low maintenance short hair is and I might just keep it for awhile once it grows in a little more.

One other note regarding makeup that has helped me mask some side effects – Since I started chemotherapy, I’ve developed some pretty serious dark circles under my eyes and they can be really tricky to cover up. I’ve found that Physicians Formula concealers work really well to cover up these under eye circles as does the ELF brand concealers found at Target on the cheap. It’s the little things that make me happy these days.

Jeff and I had a really busy weekend as we attended a good friend’s wedding in NJ on Saturday. We knew the bride in college and many of our very good friends from college were in attendance. It was amazing to see just about everyone, especially those I haven’t seen since my diagnosis. Of course, everyone asked how I was feeling but once we had that initial exchange, that was all we spoke of cancer for the whole weekend. For the first time in awhile, I felt somewhat normal and my friends allowed me to have a good time and not focus on the fact that I’m still sick. It was a wonderful break and I’m so grateful to them for making me laugh and letting me focus on something else for a few hours.

Throughout this process, I’ve found that writing my blog has led to me reading the blogs of others, either fellow cancer patients or those who maybe are going through a major change in their lives. I’ve recently taken to reading two blogs that I’ve been finding really helpful and I thought I’d share some info about them.

My friend from high school, Vanessa, has recently taken a huge step in her life and has decided to leave her job in the big city to embark on a journey of self-discovery through healthful eating and exercise. She is writing a really great blog called, “Thick and Thiin” (http://thickandthiin.blogspot.com) about her workouts, diet and everything in between. It’s a great read if you’re looking to get back on the exercise and healthy diet horse after months of chemo and radiation or even if you’re already fit and are looking to spice things up.

I’m always on the lookout for blogs written by other cancer patients who seem to have a similar outlook as me, and I’ve definitely found it in Jenn’s Cancer Blog (http://jennscancerblog.wordpress.com/). Jenn has a form of breast cancer, IDC triple negative, and was diagnosed a few months before me. Her path has been different than mine in many regards but I think her outlook is quite similar and it’s a great read for any cancer patient, but especially for newly diagnosed patients. She describes her journey in detail that is easy to understand and her radiation posts have been really helpful to me recently. We have to stand together on the cancer front and Jenn’s blog has been a big help.

In any event, that’s all for now. More radiation this week and next for me and then I’m done! I’ll be sure to write about any super powers that I pick up along the way.